Year 2005 | Volume 12    Southern Methodist University

 

For Charles DeBus, the darkroom, not the camera, is what photography is all about, even in the digital age. He seldom uses a digital camera, and shoots only black and white because “it allows me a tremendous number of interpretive capabilities,” DeBus says. The artist incorporates a painterly approach to his subjects – landscape, figure, or still life – utilizing many different processes, including gelatin silver, platinum, gum bichromate, and Iris prints. “My images are metaphors, visual statements about things that I feel very deeply. Making images allows me a more intimate understanding of life,” he says. The senior lecturer in photography at Meadows School of the Arts, who earned a B.F.A. from the University of Dallas, studied with renowned photographers Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Imogen Cunningham, Robert Heinecken, and Jerry Uelsmann. He was a stringer for the wire services and a commercial photographer, but since the 1960s has concentrated on photography as art and teaching. DeBus’ work, which is included in numerous private and public collections, can be viewed at www.crowabbeyworkshop.com.

As I Looked Up One Winter's Night
2000, hand-colored cyanotype

 

Magnolia
2004, gum bichromate print

 

Cibolo Creek
2000, gelatin silver print

 

Untitled
2004, gum bichromate print