Contact: Meredith Dickenson or Ellen Sterner
SMU News & Media Relations
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March 24, 2003

CONGRESS CALLED ON SMU PROFESSOR TO INVESTIGATE ENRON TAXES; SAYS ENRON HAD NO BUSINESS PURPOSE, ONLY TAX-DRIVEN

DALLAS (SMU) -- SMU law professor Christopher Hanna has spent a year investigating Enron's taxes back to 1985, making him one of the few people in the world who understands the labyrinth of tax shelters used by the nation's once seventh largest corporation to escape paying federal taxes.

A recognized tax specialist, Hanna was the only outside consultant to the U.S. Joint Congressional Committee on Taxation. The investigative staff delivered its three-volume report on Enron to Congress on Feb. 13. http://www.house.gov/jct/pubs03.html

Hanna will discuss his work in a forum "Enron: A Case Study in How to Report Profits and Pay No Taxes." The free public forum, presented by SMU's Center for Teaching Excellence, is at noon, Thursday, March 27, in the Hillcrest Room, Underwood Law Library, 6550 Hillcrest Avenue.

  • How did Enron use tax shelters, including offshore entities, to avoid paying taxes to the U.S. Government?
  • What lessons can be learned from the Enron case?
  • Does the Enron case indicate that the U.S. tax system is under assault and in danger of not being able to defend itself?

A University Distinguished Teaching Professor, Hanna is a member of the SMU Academy of Distinguished Teachers. The Academy presents symposia, workshops and other forums that allow SMU Distinguished Professors to share their teaching philosophies and experiences with others.


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