Contact: Ellen Sterner
SMU News & Media Relations
(214) 768-7650or
Kim Quirk
Texas Instruments
214-480-6878
k-quirk@ti.com

June 19, 2002

INFINITY PROJECT ANNOUNCES NEW SCHOOLS FOR 2002-2003; NEARLY 60 HIGH SCHOOLS IN 16 STATES WILL NOW TEACH INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM

DALLAS (SMU) -- The Infinity Project, a program sponsored by the Southern Methodist University School of Engineering and Texas Instruments that introduces engineering into the high school curriculum, will expand to nearly 60 schools in 16 states for the 2002-2003 school year.

Eighteen new schools in Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio and Texas will begin offering the program this fall. Teachers from these schools will be coming to SMU this summer to learn how to teach the Infinity curriculum.

The Infinity Project is the first in the country to help school districts incorporate state-of-the-art engineering and advanced technology into standard high school curricula. The program is designed to help students understand the real-world relevance of engineering, science and math and to expose them to high-tech career opportunities.

“It is extremely satisfying to see more and more schools adopt the Infinity curriculum,” said Torrence Robinson, worldwide university program manager for Texas Instruments. “It is a testament to the foresight of participating school administrators and teachers who comprehend the importance of students understanding the technology-driven world in which they live.”

The Infinity Project curriculum is incorporated into a year-long engineering class offered to sophomores, juniors or seniors who have completed Algebra II and one science course. The class focuses on the math and science fundamentals of the information revolution and teaches students how engineers create and design the technology around them.

The curriculum and associated technology for the Infinity Project were developed by some of the country’s leading college engineering professors, in cooperation with K-12 education experts.

To be accepted into the Infinity Project, high schools must meet four criteria. They must have committed school administrators, motivated and qualified instructors who are certified in math or science and are comfortable using computer programs, energetic students with the appropriate prerequisites, and sufficient lab equipment and space.

The Infinity Project began in 2000-2001 with 13 high schools in Dallas, Houston and San Antonio. This past year, the program expanded to 40 schools in 10 states.

The Infinity Project is one of several programs sponsored by The Institute for Engineering Education at SMU, which was created in 2001 to facilitate collaboration among universities, K-12 educational organizations and corporate entities to address the issues related to the shortfall in engineering and technical talent expected in the coming years.

“We are thrilled to be able to offer the Infinity curriculum to more and more schools,” said Geoffrey Orsak, who serves as executive director of the institute and director of the Infinity Project. “We look forward to the day when every high school in the country offers engineering to its students.”

SCHOOLS ACCEPTED INTO THE INFINITY PROJECT FOR 2002-2003

A.R. Johnson Health, Science and Engineering Magnet High School -- Augusta, Georgia
Bowie High School -- El Paso, Texas
Burlington High School -- Burlington, Iowa
Dulles High School -- Sugar Land, Texas
Elkins High School -- Missouri City, Texas
Granville High School -- Granville, Ohio
Mansfield Career & Tech Center -- Mansfield, Texas
Mason High School -- Mason, Ohio
McKinney High School -- McKinney, Texas
McKinney North High School - McKinney, Texas
Niles High School -- Niles, Michigan
Quest High School -- Humble, Texas
Sacred Hearts Academy -- Honolulu, Hawaii
Skyline High School -- Dallas, Texas
St. Edward High School -- Lakewood, Ohio
The Norwich Free Academy -- Norwich, Connecticut
United Engineering & Tech. Magnet -- Laredo, Texas
Willowridge High School -- Houston, Texas

For more information on the Infinity Project, visit its Web site at www.infinity-project.org.


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