Contact: Meredith Dickenson or Ellen Sterner
SMU News & Media Relations
(214) 768-7654
or

Contact: Kami Duncan
SMU Meadows School of the Arts
(214) 768-2788
September 5, 2001

THE ART AND POWER OF SPAIN TO COME ALIVE WITH LECTURE AT MEADOWS MUSEUM

DALLAS (SMU) - Renowned Spanish historian Sir John Elliott, Regius Professor emeritus of Modern History at Oxford University, will deliver the Stanton Sharp Lecture this fall at Southern Methodist University.

"The Art and Power in Habsburg Spain" will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, in Smith Auditorium of the Meadows Museum. The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information about the lecture, contact the Meadows Museum at 214-768-2516.

In his lecture, Professor Elliott will discuss how the Habsburg kings of Spain, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, used visual imagery to send political messages about their dynasty and about the character and aspirations of Spain's monarchy and empire. He will pay particular attention to the first two Habsburg kings of Spain, Charles V and Philip II, but will follow their innovations in the use of art as a means of showing power into the seventeenth century. The finest examples of this may be found in the paintings of Diego Velázquez, court painter to Philip IV. Professor Elliott is the author of more than six books on Spanish history.

"It can safely be said of Professor Elliott that he is the best known and most highly respected historian of Spain writing in English. Some would say he is simply the best historian of Spain now alive," says Peter Bakewell, the Edmund J. and Louise Kahn Professor of History at SMU.

Professor Elliott's books include Imperial Spain, The Revolt of the Catalans, The Count Duke of Olivares, Richelieu and Olivares, The Old World and the New, and A Palace for a King: the Buen Retiro and the Court of Philip IV.

The Meadows Museum houses the most comprehensive and one of the largest collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. With works dating from the 10th to the 20th centuries, the internationally renowned collection presents a broad spectrum of art covering a thousand years of Spanish history.

The William P. Clements Jr. Department of History in SMU's Dedman College and the Department of Art History in the Meadows School of the Arts are sponsors of the lecture. The Stanton Sharp Lecture is supported by a gift from Ruth Sharp Altshuler, chair of the SMU Board of Trustees, to honor her son, Stanton Sharp.


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