Reporters may contact: Vige Barrie
communications@mail.smu.edu
Cox School of Business
(214) 768-3678

 

April 30, 2001

COX SCHOOL RANKED IN TOP 10 IN THE WORLD BY THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

In its inaugural international ranking of business schools, The Wall Street Journal announced today that Southern Methodist University's Cox School of Business placed 9th in the world among MBA programs. The publication also ranked the Cox School #5 among small schools and #7 among private schools.

Developed and conducted jointly with Harris Interactive, the survey gathered the views of 1,600 corporate recruiters from around the world. The survey takes a unique approach, focusing on the opinions of corporate recruiters on one issue: what corporations are looking for in business schools and their graduates today. Specifically, the goal of the study was to identify school and student characteristics that recruiters consider most important when they make decisions about which schools to recruit from and which students to recruit.

"Our ranking by The Wall Street Journal as the top school in the Southwest and one of the top ten in the world is built on the success of our graduates in meeting the needs of the corporate community," said Albert W. Niemi, Jr., dean of the Cox School. This ranking comes on the heels of U.S. News & World Report's ranking of Cox as among the top five schools in the nation in terms of placement of graduates (100%) three months after graduation and among the top 20 in total compensation received by students after graduation.

Published recruiter comments in the Journal's report on the Cox School include "small, creative environment" and "exceptional people skills" among others. The Journal's special report in the Monday, April 30, issue explains further what set the top 10 schools apart from the rest. "For one thing, they significantly outscored the others on five specific attributes: teaching analytical and problem-solving skills; recruiters' past success with the quality of graduates hired from that school; the school's preparation of students for the New Economy; graduates' strategic thinking; and 'chemistry' or general good feelings about the school."

The Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive report can be found online at www.wsj.com or on the newsstands today. A 1,257-page e-book, "The Wall Street Journal Guide to Business Schools," is available at www.WSJbooks.com.



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