CUL NEWSLETTER

DECEMBER 2004

CENTRAL UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

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CALENDAR | OPPORTUNITIES | DIVISION NEWS | STAFF NEWS |

EXHIBITS & PROGRAMS | LIGHTER SIDE| STAFF SPOTLIGHT

NEW SECTION: CLASSIFIEDS 

 

CALENDAR

LIBRARY HOURS:

 Fall (August 19, 2004 - December 11, 2004)

Fondren Library Center

  • Monday-Thursday: 8:00am-2:00am
  • Friday: 8:00am-midnight
  • Saturday: 9:00am-midnight
  • Sunday: 1:00pm-2:00am

Hamon Library

  • Monday - Thursday: 8:00 am- 12:00 am
  • Friday:8:00 a.m.-  6:00 pm
  • Saturday:9:00 a.m.-  5:00 pm
  • Sunday:1:00 p.m.- 12:00 am

For other library hours see web page at www.smu.edu/libraries/hours 

 BREAK HOURS

Fall 24-Hour Study Hall (December 5, 2004 - December 11, 2004)

24-Hour Study Hall begins 9:00am Sunday, December 5, 2004 and ends 5:00pm Saturday, December 11, 2004
MUST HAVE A VALID SMU ID FOR ENTRY AFTER 10:00PM


Winter Interim 2004/2005 (December 12, 2004 - January 11, 2005)

Monday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
CLOSED
Sunday
CLOSED


Winter Holiday Break 2004 (December 18, 2004 - December 26, 2004)

CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY BREAK - SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2004 THROUGH SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2004


New Year's Eve Holiday 2005 (December 31, 2004 - January 2, 2005)

Friday - December 31, 2004
CLOSED
Saturday - January 1, 2005
CLOSED
Sunday - January 2, 2005
CLOSED

                

LEAD EVENT ANNUAL CUL HOLIDAY PARTY  Tuesday, December 14th; 12noon-2:00pm Texana Room

Come join your colleagues for food, fun and festivities!  An ornament exchange will take place at 1:00pm so don't forget your ornaments.  Be on the lookout for sign up sheets.  They should be circulating in your area now.  Sign up sheets are due back to your LEAD representative by Thursday, December 9th!

DEAN'S TEA Thursday, December 16th at 10:00 AM in the Director's Suite.

Dean McCombs would like to invite everyone to her Holiday Tea.  She hopes to see everyone there and advises you to come ready to eat drink and be merry!

OPPORTUNITIES

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARIES PROGRAM

January 29, 2005 - Day Trippin' to Fort Worth,

    Stop #1: Amon Carter Museum. On the opening day of the exhibit

    Stamped with a National Character: Nineteenth-Century American Color-Plate Books, WILLIAM S. REECE, guest curator, gives a special

    guided tour to the Friends.

Stop #2: LUNCH

    Stop #3: Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT.) BARNEY LIPSCOMB, the Leonhardt Chair of Texas Botany at the BRIT, gives members a private tour of the herbarium and the botanical library. Dr. Lipscomb also presents a talk,

    Art and Science: A Botanist's Eye: RedoutÚ and the Art of Floral Illustration, a look at the history and evolution of art and botanical science from the first century AD through the life of Pierre-Joseph RedoutÚ, one of the greatest botanical illustrators and flower painters of all time.

    Bus leaves Moody parking lot at 9:00 am. Lunch included.

    RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.  Contact Alycen x83225 for more information.

 

JC PENNEY ARCHIVES

Documenting A Retail Legacy: SMU Introduces the JC Penney Archives

The CUL Staff

is cordially invited to

a reception

celebrating the generous donation of the JC Penney Archives

December 9, 2004

10:30 am

DeGolyer Library

RSVP to Lee Batson at ext. 84222 or email lbatson@smu.edu . Indicate that you are CUL staff.

SPECIAL CARE MASSAGES

By

Chris Giddens, RMT

Treat yourself !

Tuesday December 7th & Wednesday December 8th

10:00am to 1:00pm

LEAD has arranged for Chris Giddens (same guy as last year!), a registered massage therapist to provide chair massages for CUL staff at a wonderful rate of only $10.00 per 15 minute session. Massages will be in Fondren Rm 322 (next to the Systems office) Checks accepted, made payable to Chris Giddens.

Contact Angela Laack (8-3591) or alaack@mail.smu.edu  to schedule a time. You can view the available times on the V-drive V:\ShareSpace\LEAD\Massages sign-up2004.doc Click "Read-Only" to view the document.

Please schedule your time as soon as possible!

DIVISION NEWS

CIP CANDIDATES ON CAMPUS

CUL's Cataloger Search Committee has scheduled three interviews:

Monday, December 6, 2004

Wednesday, December 8, 2004

Monday, December 13, 2004

As stated in the CIP Mission Statement "We share our expertise to facilitate access to information, provide solutions, and encourage innovation." Therefore, we are asking each candidate to prepare a 15 minute presentation to demonstrate how they would share their expertise in an area of cataloging of their choice to an audience defined by the candidates. There will be a short period after the presentation for questions from the audience. All presentations will be held in the Center for Information Processing (CIP) Conference Room. CUL staff are invited to attend.

Monday December 6th 11:00-11:30 am

Heather Barrett

Wednesday December 8th 11:00-11:30 am

Cynthia Franco

Monday December 13th 11:00-11:30 am

Stacey McGee

FOOD FOR FINES

Food for Fines - this annual fine forgiveness program will take place from Monday, November 29 through Friday, December 10. Boxes will be placed at each circulation point in CUL.

  STAFF NEWS

DECEMBER BIRTHDAYS

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

8-Dec Herbel Mary Ann CUL Dean's Office
16-Dec Cruz, Jorge FLC Systems
18-Dec Foutch, Michael FLC Circulation
19-Dec Setnick, Sandra FLC Ref

 

STAFF SPOTLIGHT

This is a new section in which a CUL staff member will be featured each month.  The purpose is to get to know each other a little better.  Please feel free to send me the profiles of your newest staff members (tvangoet@mail.smu.edu) so that we can introduce them to the rest of CUL. If you have a staff member in your area that you would like to nominate (new or old) please contact me.  (You can even volunteer yourself :) )

 

EXHIBITS & PROGRAMS

FONDREN LIBRARY CENTER EXHIBITS

EXHIBITS FOR 2004/2005

Fall Exhibits:

First Part of Fall: ARCHAEOLOGY AND IDENTITY AT CHAVES/HUMMINGBIRD PUEBLO, NEW MEXICO.

[A seminar will be held in association with this exhibit.]

Second Part of Fall: MARSH TERRY: A Man for All Seasons.

Homecoming Exhibit

Spring Exhibits:

First Part of Spring: PERIODICALS: An SMU Treasure--Old and New

Second Part of Spring: SCHOLARS OF SCIENCE: Claude Albritton and Harold Jeskey

Late April: Faculty Recognition Exhibit

LIGHTER SIDE

WHAT HAPPENED THIS MONTH IN HISTORY:

1 Sherlock Holmes appeared for the first time in print in "A Study in Scarlet." (1887)

1 In Montgomery, Rosa Parks is arrested for refusing to give up her her seat in the front section  of a bus. (1955)

2 Barney B. Clark receives the world's first artificial heart transplant. (1982)

7 Martin Van Buren becomes the eighth President of the United States, and the first president to be born in this country.

7 Thomas Edison exhibited the phonograph in 1877

7 Pearl Harbor was bombed in a surprise Japanese attack. It marked the U.S. entry into WWII.(1941)

10 Wyoming, a territory of the U.S., allowed women to vote and hold office (1869).

10 Dr. Martin  Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize. (1964)

15 Sioux Chief Sitting Bull was killed by Indian police.(1890)

15 Gone With the Wind premiered in where else but Atlanta, Georgia. (1939)

15 Infamous band leader Glenn Miller died in a plane crash over the English Channel.(1944)

16 Boston residents protesting British taxation threw tea overboard on a British ship . The Boston Tea Party was the beginning of the American fight for independence.

16 The famous World War II "Battle of the Bulge" began. (1944)

17 The Wright Brothers made their first airplane flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C. (1903)

19 Charles Dickens published "A Christmas Carol". (1843)

21 The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts. (1620)

19 Charles Dickens publishes A Christmas Carol. (1843)

21 "Snow White" premiered at theaters. (1937)

23 The transistor was invented by U.S. physicists John Bardeen, Walter H. Brittain, and William Shockley. (1947)

24 Franz Joseph Gruber composed "Silent Night". (1818)

25 Jesus Christ is born in a little town in Bethlehem (0)

25 William the Conqueror is crowned the King of England. (1066)

26 James Mason invents the coffee percolator. (1865)

27 Radio City Music Hall in New York City opens. (1932)

28 William F. Semple patented chewing gum.  (1869)

30 Edwin Hubble announces the existence of other galactic systems. (1924) Yes, the Hubble telescope was laster named after him.

DECEMBER IS:

Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month

GERD Awareness Week (Gastroesophageal Reflux disease)

Hi Neighbor Month

Safe Toys and Gifts Month

Stress Free Family Holiday Month (US National)

Read A New Book Month

Bingo Month

Write a Friend Month

1st Aids Awareness Day

2nd Eat a Red Apple Day

3rd  National Fritters Day

4th Wear Brown Shoes Day

7th Chanukah lasts 8 days

9th National Pastry Day

11th National Noodle Ring Day

12th National Ding-a-Ling Day

12th Poinsettia Day

14th National Bouillabaisse Day

15th National Lemon Cupcake Day

16th National Chocolate covered Anything Day

17th National Maple Syrup Day

21st Hamburger Day

21st Winter Solstice (shortest day of the year)

24th National Eggnog Day

26th Kwanzaa

26th or 27th Boxing Day

27th Make Cut Out Snowflakes Day

28th National Chocolate Day

30th Bicarbonate of Soda Day

A LIBRARY'S WORST NIGHTMARE

Here are photos (during and after) of the flood that hit the University of Hawaii:

http://library.kcc.hawaii.edu/main/flood/

FUN STUFF

Can you decipher the REAL titles of these exaggerated titles of very familiar Christmas tunes?
(You'll find the answers under the Candy Cane!)

 
1. From dark 'til dawn, soundless and sanctimonious.
2. Celestial messengers from splendid empires.
3. In a distant bovine diner.
4. Universal elation.
5. Ornament the enclosure with large sprigs of berry-bearing evergreen.
6. O miniature Nazarene village.
7. May Jehovah grant unto you hilarious males retirement.
8. Those of you who are true, come here!
9. Are you detecting the same aural sensations as I am?
10. The diminutive male of less than adult who plays a percussion instrument.
11. Primary Yuletide.
12. Heavenly cherubs announcing in song--listen!
13. Reigning monarchs of the Far East.
14. Proclaim it to the hills.

 

Answers:

1. Silent Night.
2. Angels We Have Heard on High.
3. Away in a Manger.
4. Joy to the World.
5. Deck the Halls with Boughs of Holly.
6. O Little Town of Bethlehem.
7. God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen.
8. O, Come All Ye Faithful.
9. Do You Hear What I Hear?
10. Little Drummer Boy.
11. The First Noel.
12. Hark, the Herald Angels Sing.
13. We Three Kings.
14. Go Tell It on the Mountain.
'Twas the night before Christmas and Santa's a wreck.

How to live in a world that's politically correct?

His workers no longer would answer to Elves,

Vertically Challenged they were calling themselves.

And labor conditions at the north pole

Were alleged by the union to stifle the soul.

Four reindeer had vanished, without much propriety,

Released to the wilds by the Humane Society.

And equal employment had made it quite clear

That Santa had better not use just reindeer.

So Dancer and Donner, Comet and Cupid,

Were replaced with 4 pigs, and you know that looked stupid!

The runners had been removed from his sleigh;

The ruts were termed dangerous by the E.P.A.

And people had started to call for the cops

When they heard sled noises on their roof-tops.

Second-hand smoke from his pipe had his workers quite frightened.

His fur trimmed red suit was called Unenlightened.

And to show you the strangeness of life's ebbs and flows,

Rudolf was suing over unauthorized use of his nose

And had gone on Geraldo, in front of the nation,

Demanding millions in over-due compensation.

So, half of the reindeer were gone; and his wife,

Who suddenly said she'd enough of this life,

Joined a self-help group, packed, and left in a whiz,

Demanding from now on her title was Ms.

And as for the gifts, why, he'd ne'er had a notion

That making a choice could cause so much commotion.

Nothing of leather, nothing of fur,

Which meant nothing for him. And nothing for her.

Nothing that might be construed to pollute.

Nothing to aim. Nothing to shoot.

Nothing that clamored or made lots of noise.

Nothing for just girls. Or just for the boys.

Nothing that claimed to be gender specific.

Nothing that's warlike or non-pacific.

No candy or sweets, they were bad for the tooth.

Nothing that seemed to embellish a truth.

And fairy tales, while not yet forbidden,

Were like Ken and Barbie, better off hidden.

For they raised the hackles of those psychological

Who claimed the only good gift was one ecological.

No baseball, no football; someone could get hurt;

Besides, playing sports exposed kids to dirt.

Dolls were said to be sexist, and should be passÚ;

And Nintendo would rot your entire brain away.

So Santa just stood there, disheveled, perplexed;

He just could not figure out what to do next.

He tried to be merry, tried to be gay,

But you've got to be careful with that word today.

His sack was quite empty, limp to the ground;

Nothing fully acceptable was to be found.

Something special was needed, a gift that he might

Give to all without angering the left or the right.

A gift that would satisfy, with no indecision,

Each group of people, every religion;

Every ethnicity, every hue,

Everyone, everywhere, even you.

So here is that gift, it's priced beyond worth.

May you and your loved ones enjoy peace on earth.
 
 

CLASSIFIEDS

This is a new section where staff can list things that they are selling or giving away.  Send items to ( well, not the actual item just a picture or brief description) tvangoet@mail.smu.edu 

Central University Libraries, Southern Methodist University

Page author: Theresa Van Goethem Meyers